Reviews & Quotes

The New York Times Critic's Pick
Two Gods "is a compelling portrait of a Black Muslim man in Newark who builds caskets and mentors two children ... With depth of feeling and warm black-and-white photography, Zeshawn Ali’s humble documentary 'Two Gods' fully acknowledges how death is a part of life."

Educational Media Reviews Online | Daniel L. Thacker, Reference and Instruction Librarian, Penn State Altoona
TWO GODS "earns a rating of Highly Recommended for a new look on Islam in America and the power of mentorship. It would work well with Sociology, African American Studies, Religious Studies, and Criminal Justice courses."

Video Librarian
"Filmmaker Zeshawn Ali captures all this in murky black and white images that resonate with the unpredictability of every day and the fallibility of each of us. When Hanif fails at one point to live up to the standards he has set for himself and for the boys, Two Gods will sadden a viewer and yet remind us that what matters is we keep trying. This edgy, often heartbreaking film redeems itself with constant restorations of faith. Strongly recommended."

The Hollywood Reporter
"A timely portrait of lives lost and redeemed." 

POV Magazine
"Two Gods is an astonishing and powerful debut by Zeshawn Ali. Presented in black and white, the story unfolds in shades of moral grey as we witness powerful characters who rise and fall when subjected to difficult circumstances. The film exudes humanity through every frame. The patience and precision of Ali’s craft elevates this sentiment ... The end result is an astonishing and beautiful debut by a rising talent. The film provides a wonderful glimpse at a community, one rocked by violence and turmoil, but still able to navigate through hope. As an audience, we are blessed with both the craft and the documentation of sublime empathy that Ali brings to the film."

Hammer to Nail
"Ali expertly gathers footage to profile the travails and personal growth of his protagonists. It’s a moving, profound odyssey."

Eye For Film
Two Gods "stands as a testimony to the importance of community support and the healing powers of the rituals that surround grief in any religion."