GREENWOOD: A DREAMLAND DESTROYED
Film Poster for "Greenwood: A Dreamland Destroyed" with four quadrants. Three of the quadrants have images and one of the quadrants is the film title on a purple background
GREENWOOD: A DREAMLAND DESTROYED
Film Poster for "Greenwood: A Dreamland Destroyed" with four quadrants. Three of the quadrants have images and one of the quadrants is the film title on a purple background
A destroyed dreamland erased from history

GREENWOOD: A DREAMLAND DESTROYED

Regular price $129.00
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BEST DOCUMENTARY - Indianapolis Black Documentary Film Festival | HONORABLE MENTION - Germany International Film Festival | OFFICIAL SELECTIONS - Greenwood Film Festival, Rhode Island Black Film Festival & Ridgewood International Film Festival

Greenwood Massacre • White Supremacy • Racial Violence  • Challenging Erasure & Calling for Equity 

Date of Completion: 2022 | Run Time: 44 minutes​​ | Language: English | Captions: Yes | Includes: Transcript | Director: Brian Day | Producer(s): Brian Day, Daniel Donaghy & Alycia Bright-Holland | Writers: Daniel Donaghy & Brian Day | Choreography: Alycia Bright-Holland | Poems: Daniel Donaghy | Music: Jeff Calissi

Greenwood, a prosperous black town in Oklahoma, was destroyed, burned to the ground, in 18 hours by a large violent white mob in June of 1921. The history of this massacre has been ignored and hidden for 100 years, another act of erasure in America. This is an experimental documentary that combines dance, poetry, music and film to create a documentary experience like you have never seen before.

AWARDS
Honorable Mention | Germany International Film Festival
Best Documentary | Indianapolis Black Documentary Film Festival
Official Selection | Greenwood Film Festival
Official Selection | Rhode Island Black Film Festival
Official Selection | Ridgewood International Film Festival

Brian Day has been making films for over 3 decades. And, he has been teaching students how to make films for almost 2 decades. He is a passionate and curious filmmaker.

Brian Day got his MFA from the University of New Orleans in 1995 and then spent 12 years working on Hollywood films, mostly in film editing rooms. He left Hollywood and entered the classroom in 2007 and he has been teaching and making independent films ever since.

Around 2009 Brian ventured into documentary filmmaking when he made a film called Winnersville that explored race relations in a southern town. Since then he has worked on half a dozen documentary films. Currently he is working on a 6-part documentary series about the history of tobacco farming in Connecticut and how it had a global impact on Civil Rights and culture.